Reps. Cheape, Fale and Ward Address HB 535 – HOMELESS PROGRAMS

RELATING TO HOMELESS PROGRAMS.
Report Title: Homelessness; Temporary Nighttime Parking Lots
Description: Authorizes the designation of temporary nighttime parking lots in each county to provide safe overnight parking for homeless individuals who live and sleep in their motor vehicles and who would otherwise park overnight on public or private roads or property. Appropriates funds. Effective July 1, 2030. (HB535 HD2)

3/5/2013 H Passed Third Reading as amended in HD 2 with Representative(s) Fale, Jordan, Kawakami, Morikawa, Ward voting aye with reservations; Representative(s) Aquino, Cheape, Cullen, Fukumoto, Johanson, Tokioka, Wooley, Yamane voting no (8) and none excused (0). Transmitted to Senate.

hb535 wardContact: repcheape@capitol.hawaii.gov, repfale@capitol.hawaii.gov or repward@capitol.hawaii.gov Excerpt from Capitol TV

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Rep. Cheape Addresses HB 1149 – RELATING TO WIND ENERGY FACILITIES

Measure Title: RELATING TO WIND ENERGY FACILITIES.
Report Title: Wind Energy Facilities; Decommissioning
Description: Requires wind energy facility owner to be responsible for facility decommissioning and to provide evidence of financial security unless the owner has an existing lease or other agreement that provides for decommissioning. Effective July 1, 2030. (HB1149 HD3)

3/5/2013 H Passed Third Reading as amended in HD 3 with Representative(s) Fale voting aye with reservations; none voting no (0) and none excused (0). Transmitted to Senate.

cheape hb1149Contact: repcheape@capitol.hawaii.gov Excerpt from Capitol TV

Rep. Lauren Cheape Addresses HB407 – RELATING TO CANCER

Measure Title: RELATING TO CANCER.
Report Title: Comprehensive Breast and Cervical Cancer Control Program ($)
Description: Appropriates funds to the Department of Health for the Comprehensive Breast and Cervical Cancer Control Program. Effective July 1, 2050. (HB407 HD2)

3/5/2013 H Passed Third Reading as amended in HD 2 with none voting aye with reservations; none voting no (0) and none excused (0). Transmitted to Senate.
• Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in Hawaii.
• It is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among women.
• Early detection of breast cancer increases the opportunity for effective treatment and survival.
• Hawaii’s Breast and Cervical Cancer Control Program provides critical screening and early detection to women who are at high risk, uninsured or underinsured, and have incomes below 250% of the federal poverty level.

hb407 cheapeContact: repcheape@capitol.hawaii.gov Excerpt from capitol TV

Hawaii House of Representatives Honored Local World War II Soldiers for Their Enduring Support of the Children of a Japanese Orphanage

Hawaii soldiers led by Master Sergeant Hugh O’Reilly who together, on Christmas Day 1949, committed to years of caring for the orphans of the Holy Family Home Orphanage of Osaka, Japan will be honored Wednesday by the Hawaii House of Representatives. The soldiers provided significant personal time and financial support during and after the war to help to improve living conditions for the children.

In 1957 and 1958 respectively, the soldiers began two traditions that continue to this day. During Christmastime, children from the Holy Family Home are invited to visit the soldiers and their families stationed in Hawaii, and two soldiers visit the orphanage to act as “Father Christmas,” offering gifts and companionship to the children.

House of Representatives floor presentation commending the 27th Infantry Regiment Wolfhounds and Master Sergeant Hugh O’Reilly for its Peace Bridge with Japan

Offered by State Representatives Lauren Kealohilani Cheape and K. Mark Takai

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House of Representatives Chamber

Front row left to right:

Command Sergeant Major James Wadsworth, 2nd Battalion of the 27th Infantry Regiment; Ms. Kuniko Iwaki, Friend of the O’Reilly Family, Mrs. Yuko O’Reilly, wife of that special soldier, Master Sergeant Hugh O’Reilly, Lieutenant Colonel Barrett Bernard, Commander of the 2nd Battalion of the 27th, Ms. Norma Vantoll, Relative of the O’Reilly Family (Hugh Jr’s Mother-in-Law), Command Sergeant Major Tony Tuck, 1st Battalion of the 27th Infantry Regiment

Back row left to right:

Mr. Hugh O’Reilly, Junior, son of Sergeant O’Reilly, Representative Lauren Kealohilani Cheape, Ms. Mora Dolormente President of Peace Bridge, Incorporated and Representative K. Mark Takai

Rep. Cheape addresses HB 174 – Relating to Food Labeling

RELATING TO FOOD LABELING.
Report Title: Genetically Engineered Organisms; Produce; Labeling; Import
Description: Requires all imported genetically engineered fresh produce sold in Hawaii to be labeled as “genetically engineered”. Requires disclosure of genetic engineering and compliance with recommendations of the Invasive Species Council upon import. Effective July 1, 2050. (HB174 HD1)

Reported from AGR (Stand. Com. Rep. No. 253) as amended in HD 1, recommending passage on Second Reading and referral to CPC.
2/8/2013 H Passed Second Reading as amended in HD 1 and referred to the committee(s) on CPC with Representative(s) Fale, Fukumoto, Oshiro, Tsuji, Ward voting aye with reservations; none voting no (0) and Representative(s) Cachola, Har, McDermott excused (3).

Contact: repcheape@capitol.hawaii.gov

Representative Lauren Cheape Says Labeling of Imported GMO Whole Produce a Good Compromise to Help Both Consumers and Farmers

Original bill draft overlooked practical challenges facing small farms

Image Representative Lauren Kealohilani Cheape made the following statement today regarding the House Committee on Agriculture’s passage of House Bill 174 requiring labeling of genetically modified food in Hawaii:

“Having grown up on a farm and now representing a largely agricultural district, my first priority is providing local food for local people,” said Rep. Cheape. “I believe that consumers have a right to know what is in their food, but for local agriculture to succeed long-term in Hawaii, the practical costs to Hawaii’s small farmers must also be considered.”

“I’m pleased with today’s amendments to require labeling on only imported genetically modified whole fruits and vegetables. The original bill would have placed a burden on local livestock farmers to determine the conditions under which animal feed and all other components produced prior to use by the local farmer were created. Assuring the absence of GMOs throughout the entire process would have cost time and resources that many farmers cannot afford,” she continued.

“There has been a loud cry from the community on this issue,” she said. “I feel it is our responsibility as lawmakers to listen and take a small step forward in providing Hawaii consumers the ability to receive more information about their food without hurting local farmers.”

Rep. Cheape’s great-grandfather started Peterson’s Upland Farm in 1910 that her family continues to own and operate. She represents District 45, which includes Schofield, Mokuleia, Waialua, Kunia, Waipio Acres and Mililani.

House Republicans Caution that a Sudden Minimum Wage Increase Could Put People Out of Work

ImageThe House Minority Caucus urged caution today as two bills to increase the minimum wage to 120 percent its current level passed the Labor & Public Employment and Economic Development & Business committees.

“The Minority Caucus would like to see higher rates of employment and higher incomes for all workers across our state, but we’re concerned that Hawaii is still recovering from a bad recession. We should first focus on reducing people’s cost of living and growing our entire economy so employers can afford to increase wages without going out of business,” said Minority Leader Aaron Ling Johanson.

“Hawaii’s economy is getting stronger but is still on shaky ground,” said Representative Gene Ward, Vice Chair of the Committee on Economic Development and Business. “Many of these jobs won’t exist if employers are pushed too far. I echo the business community’s concerns that a 20 percent increase on January 1, 2014 could be too much too soon.”

HB 916, introduced at the request of Governor Neil Abercrombie, would require employers to pay at least $8.75 per hour beginning January 1, 2014 and would be tied to the consumer price index indefinitely. HB 1028 was amended to increase the minimum wage to the same level by 50 cents per year until 2016. The state last increased its minimum wage to $7.25 in 2007.