Rep. Gene Ward Questions Roll Call Vote on Rail

Reps. Ward, Thielen and Tupola Address Rail Floor Amendments

Representative Gene Ward (H District 17Hawaii Kai, Kalama Valley), Representative Cynthia Thielen (H District 50 Kailua, Kaneohe Bay) and Representative Andria Tupola (H District 43 Ewa Villages, Kalaeloa, Honokai Hale, Nanakai Gardens, Ko Olina, Kahe Point, Nanakuli, Lualualei, Maili) address floor amendments on rail in relationship to SB1183 SD2 HD2 CD1

Contact: repward@capitol.hawaii.gov – repthielen@capitol.hawaii.gov and reptupola@capitol.hawaii.gov

Excerpt from Capitol TV

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QGPc2hBMZYI&feature=youtu.be

Reps. Thielen and Tokioka Address Rail Floor Amendments

Representative Cynthia Thielen (H District 50 Kailua, Kaneohe Bay) and Representative James Tokioka (H District 15 Wailua Homesteads, Hanamaulu, Lihue, Puhi, Old Koloa Town, Omao) address floor amendments on rail in relationship to SB1183 SD2 HD2 CD1.  Representative Gene Ward (H District 17Hawaii Kai, Kalama Valley) asks the question “How can we have a voice vote on a billion dollar proration?”

Contact: repward@capitol.hawaii.gov – repthielen@capitol.hawaii.gov and reptokioka@capitol.hawaii.gov

Excerpt from Capitol TV

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5HXQ0UPA_AY&t=35s

Rep. Gene Ward Questions Roll Call Vote on Rail

Representative Gene Ward (H District 17Hawaii Kai, Kalama Valley) asks the question “How can we have a voice vote on a billion dollar proration?”

Contact: repward@capitol.hawaii.gov

Excerpt from Capitol TV

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wwpdZdIflg&feature=youtu.be

 

Lifetime Achievement Award

surf-riders-life-time-achievemnt-award-with-rep-cynthia-thielenThe Surfrider Foundation is dedicated to the protection and enjoyment of the world’s ocean, waves and beaches through a powerful activist network.

At the 14th annual John Kelly Awards in the beautiful Waimea Valley, each year the O‘ahu Chapter hosts this memorable event to honor the legacy of John Kelly, the founder and leader of Save Our Surf (SOS), and to highlight important work.  The theme this year was built on a national campaign called Long Live the Beach.

For the Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2016 year’s winner is Cynthia Thielen, who has been fighting for the environment for decades.  As an attorney, Thielen helped stopped the bombing of Kaho’olawe.  As representative for Kailua in the State Capitol, she has been a strong ally in the fight for renewable energy, coastal protection and preservation of our natural environment.

 

SB 2659 BILL SIGNING – Relating to Industrial Hemp

SB 2659 – establishes an industrial hemp pilot program through the Department of Agriculture which allows the cultivation of industrial hemp and distribution of hemp seed in Hawai‘i for purposes of agricultural or academic research. Comments by Governor David Ige, Representative Cynthia Thielen and Senator Mike Gabbard.

Bill signing with Senator and Reps

Left to right: Senator Sam Slom, Representatives Della Au Belatti, Cynthia Thielen, Senators Mike Gabbard and Will Espero – seated Governor David Ige.

 

Patients Caught In The Crossfire Of HMSA’s ‘War On Doctors’

civil beatApril 26, 2016

By Cynthia Thielen

 Patients Caught In The Crossfire Of HMSA’s ‘War On Doctors’

HMSA is harming patients with its war on doctors. This year, the state’s largest health insurer yanked doctors’ previously earned ability to order medical tests without pre-approval delays. This month, it’s changing doctors’ pay. In essence, the less time and tests that a doctor gives patients, the more money the doctor gets.

HMSA’s new payment system replaces the fee-for-service structure that reimburses doctors based on the types of medical services rendered and the number of visits. The new system even rewards physicians with financial bonuses for healthier patients who require less medical care.

So the squeeze is on for caring, skilled doctors and consequently, HMSA’s 720,000 member-patients. The new compensation system is called capitated payments. Some might call it decapitating patients’ rights or crippling doctors, and HMSA’s comments to the contrary are appalling.

Capitation pays doctors a fixed rate that apparently falls between the general range of $20 and $80 per patient per month in a practice – whether or not a patient visits the doctor. Money-wise, the best scenario is healthy patients who don’t visit the office because sicker patients who require more time, care and expensive tests may lead to the doctor’s practice spending more money than it receives.

The danger is that the financial reality could be to limit complicated patient cases because it might take just one patient with a serious illness to bankrupt a medical practice.

The American College of Physicians website says, “Capitation payments are used by managed care organizations to control health care costs. Capitation payments control use of health care resources by putting the physician at financial risk for services provided to patients.”

What doctor who truly wants to help people can survive in a cancerous capitation-payment system? When capitation was previously tried in Hawaii, its malignancy caused local medical groups to hemorrhage significant financial damages. Presently, some doctors are already succumbing to the pressures of capitation by walking away from their practices.

Really, HMSA?

With capitation metastasizing among HMSA’s 3,000 in-network doctors, what chance is there that new or experienced physicians from outside of Hawaii will come here to practice medicine? This includes our state’s own keiki, who are completing their residency in the mainland, hoping to return home to practice. There is no incentive, no livelihood and no hope if this assault on the healing profession continues to escalate.

Hawaii is lucky to have a wise, respected and much older community in its midst. Add to that the baby boomer generation, aged 52 to 70 in 2016, who are the highest adult users of health care services. Our need for more – not less – highly skilled practicing doctors is obvious.

Many doctors are speaking loud and clear about being thrust into a position that could lead to hurting patients due to an insurance company’s bottom line taking precedence over people’s well-being. HMSA needs to go back to the drawing board in its newly renovated multi-million-dollar building with lavish bathrooms and find better solutions. Rethinking its budget appropriations for new construction would be a start. Perhaps members could pay adjustable monthly premium rates to HMSA – based on patient satisfaction. That’s our cost-containment, our bottom-line priority and our best interest.

As one practicing doctor recently sarcastically lamented to my office, “I will be happy when the insurance companies not only make all the rules for practicing medicine, but also are liable for the results.”

 headshot dec 2011

 About the Author

Rep. Cynthia Thielen is a member of House committees on Judiciary; Energy and Environmental Protection; Water, Land and Ocean Resources; Housing; and Consumer Protection and Commerce. She is also a member of the Women’s, Keiki, and Kupuna caucuses.

 

 

 

Rep. Thielen questions A&B on the Hemp Bill SB 2659

Representative Cynthia Thielen (Kailua, Kaneohe Bay) questions the Alexander & Baldwin spokesman on provisions in the bill regarding Hemp farming.

RELATING TO INDUSTRIAL HEMP.
Description:  Establishes an industrial hemp pilot program to allow the cultivation of industrial hemp and distribution of its seed in Hawaii through limited activities by licensee-agents of the board of agriculture for purposes of agricultural or academic research. Appropriates funds for department of agriculture staff to assist in the pilot program.

From the Honolulu Advertiser:  “In written testimony for SB 2659, Mike Moran, president of the Kihei Community Association,  said the measure could ultimately provide relief to Maui after the closure of Hawaii’s last sugar plantation.”

The House Finance committee passed the bill with no amendments.

Contact: repthielen@capitol.hawaii.gov  Except from Capitol TV